Speakers 2018

Distinguished Professor Jagadish Chennuptai
Australian National University

Professor Jagadish is a Distinguished Professor and Head of Semiconductor Optoelectronics and Nanotechnology Group in the Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University. He has served as Vice-President and Secretary Physical Sciences of the Australian Academy of Science during 2012-2016. He is currently serving as President of IEEE Photonics Society and President of Australian Materials Research Society. Prof. Jagadish is an Editor/Associate editor of 6 Journals (EIC-Progress in Quantum Electronics), 3 book series and serves on editorial boards of 20 other journals. He has published more than 890 research papers (610 journal papers), holds 5 US patents, co-authored a book, co-edited 12 books and edited 12 conference proceedings and 17 special issues of Journals.
He won the 2000 IEEE Millennium Medal and received Distinguished Lecturer awards from IEEE NTC, IEEE LEOS and IEEE EDS. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering, The World Academy of Sciences, US National Academy of Inventors, Indian National Science Academy, Indian Academy of Sciences, Indian National Academy pf Engineering, Andhra Pradesh Akademi of Science, IEEE, APS, MRS, OSA, AVS, ECS, SPIE, AAAS, FEMA, APAM, IoP (UK), IET (UK), IoN (UK) and the AIP. He received Peter Baume Award from the ANU in 2006, the Quantum Device Award from ISCS in 2010, IEEE Photonics Society Distinguished Service Award in 2010, IEEE Nanotechnology Council Distinguished Service Award in 2011 and Electronics and Photonics Division Award of the Electrochemical Society in 2012, 2013 Walter Boas Medal, 2015 IEEE Pioneer Award in Nanotechnology, 2015 IEEE Photonics Society Engineering Achievement Award, 2016 MRSI Silver Jubilee Anniversary Medal, 2016 Distinguished Fellow of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2016 OSA Nick Holonyak Jr Award, 2017 Welker Award, 2017 IUMRS Somiya Award, 2017 Nayudamma Award, 2018 Magnolia Silver Award and 2018 AVS Nanotechnology Recognition Award. He has received Australia’s highest civilian honor, AC, Companion of the Order of Australia, as part of 2016 Australia day honors from the Governor General of Australia for his contributions to physics and engineering, in particular nanotechnology. He holds honorary appointments in US, Japan, China and India.

Professor Michelle Coote
Australian National University

Professor Michelle Coote is a graduate of the University of New South Wales, where she completed a B.Sc. (Hons) in industrial chemistry (1995), followed by a Ph.D. in polymer chemistry (2000). Following postdoctoral work at the University of Durham, UK, she joined the Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University in 2001, initially as a postdoctoral fellow with Professor Leo Radom. She established her own research group in 2004 and was promoted to Professor in 2011. She has published extensively in the fields of polymer chemistry, radical chemistry and computational quantum chemistry, and is a member of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science. She has received many awards including the 2001 IUPAC prize for young scientists, the RACI Cornforth medal (2000), Rennie medal (2006) David Sangster Polymer Science and Technology Achievement Award (2010) and HG Smith medal (2016), the Le Fevre Memorial Prize of the Australian Academy of Science (2010) and the Pople Medal of the Asia-Pacific Association for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry (2015). In 2014, she was elected to the Fellowship of the Australian Academy of Science, and in 2017 she was awarded a Georgina Sweet ARC Laureate Fellowship. She is also currently an Associate Editor of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Associate Professor Tara Murphy
The University of Sydney

Tara Murphy is an astrophysicist working at the University of Sydney and an Australian Research Council Future Fellow. She leads an international team of researchers trying to detect and study transient and highly variable astrophysical phenomena with the MWA and ASKAP radio telescopes in Western Australia. In 2017 her team detected the first radio emission from a gravitational wave event caused by the merger of two neutron stars. Tara is also passionate about teaching and public outreach. In 2014 she co-founded a start-up company, Grok Learning, to get high school students around the world excited about computational thinking.